Posted in Writing

Showing vs. Telling

A terrific blog post to help get your head around showing and telling.

Another article, same blog: How to kill Adverbs and Adjectives. Great advice.

 

A Writer's Path

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If there was one piece of writing advice I disliked most as a new writer, it certainly was “Show, don’t tell.” Initially, I had no idea what it meant. Self-help writing blogs often toss this phrase around without examples. I even had a critique done on my writing once, and the person critiquing said this phrase several times but offered no help on what showing actually meant.

Finally, I stumbled upon a quote that changed my outlook on writing forever.

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Author:

I started blogging in an effort to keep the old brain cells alive. I'm writing a fantasy series, I take more MOOCs than I can handle, and am trying to get my Nikon D3000 off auto. I live in Victoria, Australia, with my husband and our dog, Vika.

5 thoughts on “Showing vs. Telling

  1. I also follow his blog 🙂 It’s great. I’ve been confused about this concept at times, but I hope that when I write new content, I can be conscious of it 🙂 I’ll be paying close attention to this post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Lorelle, lovely to see you swing by my blog. I most likely went over to ‘A Writer’s Path’ from your place. Showing instead of telling is helping me get over a lifetime of writing passive speech.

      I’ve been thinking about you today and your efforts to get published – prompted by William Bernhardt’s newsletter in my inbox this morning. He said: “During the past three years, far more first-time authors have received contracts from Big Five publishers based upon high sales of their self-published eBooks than because some agent pitched their unproven manuscript.” 😮

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for thinking of me 🙂 That is really interesting information. I sometimes do think, with the amount of background work I’m doing, self-publishing becomes a more viable option every day that passes! It’s like all the risk is on the writer these days. What’s left for the publisher to do? Mainly – shelf space. I think that those book purchasing agreements with book sellers would probably be the big plus? *shrugs*
        I would love you to do a post on the passive voice. Is this only a 3rd person pov problem? I’ve come across it a few times lately and can’t quite get my head around it :S You know I’m never shy about voicing my naivety 🙂 And you have always been so helpful, I know you’ll ensure it makes sense 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hi Lorelle, from what I’ve read, shelf space in a bookshop is only a fleeting thing – the books are not purchased by the bookshops but taken on consignment – unsold books go back. Unless you are are a ‘name’ or the next ‘big thing’ your book will get no special treatment in a bookshop.

        My own post on passive voice? Funny you should mention that, I was thinking about sharing a simple way I learned recently to identify it in my writing. Will do my best! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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